Clivia Flower Fade Pruneing

Clivia Flower Fade Pruneing. Move up to the next pot size only, gradually increasing the size over time. Cut back to the green portion of the foliage, shaping it as desired so it blends in with the rest of the foliage.

PlantFiles Pictures Clivia, Bush Lily, Fire Lily, Natal
PlantFiles Pictures Clivia, Bush Lily, Fire Lily, Natal from davesgarden.com

Clivia needs repotting only once the existing pot is full of roots. Clumps should only need dividing every three to five years. In summer, place potted plant dappled shade (indirect light).

To Remove Flowering Parts, First Cut Off The Emerging Fruits Left After Flowers Fall With A Clean Razor To Reduce Plant Energy Diversion To Fruiting.

Increase drainage with a layer of gravel or clay pebbles along the bottom of the pot, to make water flow through more easily. Ensure each section has adequate fleshy roots, and avoid damaging the fleshy base of the plant. You may also want to prune back clivias to prevent them from becoming overgrown or unruly.

Move Up To The Next Pot Size Only, Gradually Increasing The Size Over Time.

Clivia is usually divided or propagated in spring after flowering, although this may be carefully done all year round. In warmest zone if planted outside, tolerates dry shade once established. Clumps should only need dividing every three to five years.

The Only Pruning A Clivia Needs Is Removal Of Dying Leaves And Flowers.

In very warm zones, these plants are used for landscaping.